Wuthering Heights: ultimate Gothic

Who decides which books readers and students should immerse themselves in and discuss with breathlessly reverent tones? It goes much deeper and quieter than the authorial decisions of writers: whose fingerprints are on the catalogue of must-read-literature?

Professor Deirdre Coleman, a specialist in 18th and 19th-century literature at the University of Melbourne, considers Wuthering Heights a quintessential classic.

via Wuthering Heights: ultimate Gothic.

Gothic Romantic Fiction, The Darker The Better? | MARSocial Author Business Enhancement Horror Post

Juliette Binoche, Wuthering Heights

Do you take it dark with a twist of weird on the side? I do! Why is that? Why do many of us find Heathcliff (Wuthering Heights) so compelling? Why are we caught up in his angst? Remember the horrific scene when he opens Cathy’s coffin? We condemn it, it’s too awful to contemplate but we understand his awful dilemma: he cannot bear the world without her!

via Gothic Romantic Fiction, The Darker The Better? | MARSocial Author Business Enhancement Horror Post.

A True Novel | The Japan Times

A True Novel

Like all artists, novelists find the impetus to begin in various places. Some inspire themselves with a formal challenge. Georges Perec, for example, asked himself what would happen if he tried to write a novel entirely bereft of the letter “e.” Others, in their doodling and false starts, stumble upon a sentence that compels them to go on, perhaps because that sentence seems to contain, in its 10 or 20 words, the novel that must be written. The opening of Jane Austen’s “Pride and Prejudice” — “It is a truth universally acknowledged, that a single man in possession of a good fortune, must be in want of a wife” — is exemplary in this regard. Most commonly, though, novels find their genesis in other novels: Books are built upon books. In some cases the books upon which other books are built are difficult for the undiscerning reader to see: the Wilkie Collins in Franz Kafka, for example. In other cases, the source texts are obvious and acknowledged. Minae Mizumura’s “A True Novel” is one of those.

via A True Novel | The Japan Times.

Audio Review: Wuthering Nights: An Erotic Retelling of Wuthering Heights by Emily Bronte

This isn’t quite the beloved Bronte classic you read in high school English class. But it’s not a bad retelling of it either—that is, if you don’t mind adding a healthy dose of erotica. In Miller’s version, the relationship between Catherine and Heathcliff becomes more elicit and a much more sexy. Narrator Joy Pratt brings a distinct femininity to the book, her accented voice ably capturing the spirit of the prose. Pratt’s delivery is flawless; her tone and pronunciation perfect. And, she manages to convey both the newer material and the original text in a similar manner.

via Audio Review: Wuthering Nights: An Erotic Retelling of Wuthering Heights by Emily Bronte and I.J. Miller, read by Joy Pratt. AudioGO, unabridged, eight CDs, 12.25 hrs., $34.98 ISBN 978-1-4789-5212-1.