Review: ‘The Poet and the Vampyre,’ by Andrew McConnell Stott | Star Tribune

The Poet and the Vampyre,' by Andrew McConnell Stott

One of literary history’s legendary events really did happen on a dark and stormy night. While the “rain descended in sheets” on Lac Léman (now known as Lake Geneva, Switzerland), western culture’s most famous monster was conceived and the modern vampire first imagined. Andrew McConnell Stott’s “The Poet and the Vampyre” explores the sexual politics (and sexual relations) among the three men — Percy Shelley, Lord Byron and John Polidori — and the two women — Mary Godwin (soon to be Mary Shelley) and her stepsister, Claire Clairmont — who sat at a blazing fire telling ghost stories that night in 1816.

via Review: 'The Poet and the Vampyre,' by Andrew McConnell Stott | Star Tribune.

‘The Strain’ Revamps a Classic

The creative and innovative genius of the horror and fantasy genre, Guillermo del Toro, has found another hit in his latest TV series for FX, called The Strain. The book-to-screen adaptation of a present-day New York City overrun by a vampiric virus is a refreshing new spin on the classic mythos of Bram Stoker’s Dracula. Borrowing similar eerie details, del Toro’s and Chuck Hogan’s best-selling novel features familiar horror elements, plot and characters from the classic novel, revamped for a new generation without the romanticism.

via ‘The Strain’ Revamps a Classic.

Project MUSE – Bram Stoker: History, Psychoanalysis, and the Gothic review

The twelve essays in this collection go a long way toward correcting the mistaken impression that Bram Stoker wrote only a single Gothic work, Dracula 1897, or, more damaging, that he was a second-rate writer whose neurosis erupted into a modern myth. Indeed the Preface announces that "Stoker’s work blends the Gothic with the discourses of politics, sexuality, medicine and national identity to produce texts that may be read by a variety of critical methodologies" ix, and the accompanying essays demonstrate how Stoker blends the Gothic with fields that seem antithetical to its preoccupation with mystery — politics, medicine, and science, to mention a few.

via Project MUSE – Bram Stoker: History, Psychoanalysis, and the Gothic review.

Guillermo Del Toro and Carlton Cuse Are the Masters of ‘The Strain’ – Spinoff Online – TV, Film, and Entertainment News DailySpinoff Online – TV, Film, and Entertainment News Daily

Vampire fiction has long hewed to its Gothic roots, with rare deviations from the stake-fearing, sunlight-avoiding cornerstones.

But with their new FX series The Strain, based on the bestselling novels by Guillermo del Toro and Chuck Hogan, executive producers del Toro and Carlton Cuse hope to take a more modern – and more scientific –  approach to bloodsuckers without losing the visceral thrill of bloody horror. Ahead of tonight’s premiere, Spinoff Online participated in a press call in which the two discusses their uncompromising view of vampire biology, the benefit to working on cable television, the design of their master vampire and the series’ five-year plan.

via Guillermo Del Toro and Carlton Cuse Are the Masters of 'The Strain' – Spinoff Online – TV, Film, and Entertainment News DailySpinoff Online – TV, Film, and Entertainment News Daily.

Sacramento News & Review – Only Lovers Left Alive – Blood lust – Film Reviews – Film – May 22, 2014

Much as he did with the Western in Dead Man and samurai-gangster movies in Ghost Dog: The Way of the Samurai, writer-director Jim Jarmusch has a blast recontextualizing genre rules we thought we knew by heart with his latest film, the droll comedy Only Lovers Left Alive. In this case, he infiltrates the bloodstream of the “vampire movie” with a deadpan critique of cultural vapidity, and he doesn’t spare the imperiously condescending bloodsuckers too drug-addled and self-pitying to make a difference.

via Sacramento News & Review –

Bite Me

– Film Reviews – Film – May 22, 2014.