The dark side | On Saturday | :: The Kathmandu Post ::

Robert Louis Stevenson’s The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde is an oblique and artful Gothic tale framed as a detective story. The truth seeker is Jekyll’s lawyer, Utterson, the book’s most prominent character. Jekyll—the gentleman who dabbles in chemical self-transformation—appears only intermittently, never fully speaking for himself until the end, when he discloses the details of the disastrous experiments that unleashed his primitive alter ego. The novel isn’t a conventional horror story, lingering on the macabre for its own sake, but an allegory of the divided self, perhaps also a meditation on addiction. Stevenson dramatises human duality but doesn’t analyse its causes, treating it as pervasive and fundamental. For him, the Jekyll-Hyde split is the split in all of us, between the animals we evolved from and the angels we aspire to be.

via The dark side | On Saturday | :: The Kathmandu Post ::.

‘Hyde,’ by Daniel Levine – NYTimes.com

Robert Louis Stevenson’s “The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde” is an oblique and artful Gothic tale framed as a detective story. The truth seeker is Jekyll’s lawyer, Utterson, the book’s most prominent character. Jekyll — the ­gentleman who dabbles in chemical self-­transformation — appears only ­intermittently, never fully speaking for himself until the end, when he discloses the details of the disastrous experiments that unleashed his primitive alter ego. The novel isn’t a conventional horror story, lingering on the macabre for its own sake, but an allegory of the divided self, perhaps also a meditation on addiction. Stevenson dramatizes human duality but doesn’t analyze its causes, treating it as pervasive and fundamental. For him, the Jekyll-Hyde split is the split in all of us, between the animals we evolved from and the angels we aspire to be.

via ‘Hyde,’ by Daniel Levine – NYTimes.com.

4 Famous Authors Who Got Their Stories in Dreams: Stephen King, Stephenie Meyer, More: photo 2

The universe is full of mysteries that challenge our current knowledge.

In “Beyond Science” Epoch Times collects stories about these strange phenomena to stimulate the imagination and open up previously undreamed of possibilities. Are they true? You decide.

Inspiration, dreams, and fancy all seem to come from the same ethereal realm accessed by part of us that isn’t quite of this practical and mundane world.

These authors, however, weren’t merely inspired in the usual sense—their dream visions were unusually clear, and at least one them felt his famous work was partly written by someone else.

via 4 Famous Authors Who Got Their Stories in Dreams: Stephen King, Stephenie Meyer, More: photo 2.