Review: ‘The Poet and the Vampyre,’ by Andrew McConnell Stott | Star Tribune

The Poet and the Vampyre,' by Andrew McConnell Stott

One of literary history’s legendary events really did happen on a dark and stormy night. While the “rain descended in sheets” on Lac Léman (now known as Lake Geneva, Switzerland), western culture’s most famous monster was conceived and the modern vampire first imagined. Andrew McConnell Stott’s “The Poet and the Vampyre” explores the sexual politics (and sexual relations) among the three men — Percy Shelley, Lord Byron and John Polidori — and the two women — Mary Godwin (soon to be Mary Shelley) and her stepsister, Claire Clairmont — who sat at a blazing fire telling ghost stories that night in 1816.

via Review: 'The Poet and the Vampyre,' by Andrew McConnell Stott | Star Tribune.

Mythology, monsters, and Mary Shelley: The enduring fascination of Frankenstein’s creation – Features – Books – The Independent

Mary Shelley

We will each write a ghost story, said Lord Byron, and his proposition was acceded to.” So wrote Mary Shelley in the preface to her first novel, Frankenstein, published in 1831, 15 years after one of the most mythologised events in literary history. That was the famous night at the Villa Diodati, near Lake Geneva, in 1816, when Byron, Mary Godwin, Percy Shelley and John Polidori, Byron’s doctor, gathered by the fire to make up ghost stories. Two of the horror genre’s most enduring monsters were born: the vampire and Victor Frankenstein’s unnamed creation. But Mary also wrote herself into fiction by mythologising further a group of writers who have been the subject of both biography and fiction, ever since.

via Mythology, monsters, and Mary Shelley: The enduring fascination of Frankenstein’s creation – Features – Books – The Independent.