Jane Eyre as a Female Gothic Novel – Student Pulse

Charlotte Brontë invests gothic elements in Jane Eyre with a symbolic meaning to create a new, ‘female’ language. It is through this female Gothic language that Brontë creates a heroine whose autobiographical mode of writing is used to trace a story of female rebellion and search for identity. Although the use of gothic as the new ‘female’ language is a subversion of the predominant phallocentric language of the time, the need for a woman writer to make her assertions through the gothic, the symbolic and therefore the indirect implies that this new female gothic also represents the agency the woman and girl in 19th century Victorian England did not have. The romantic aspect of Gothic is used to reflect and rebel against this reality which is done from the Eurocentric perspective of a 19th century British woman.

via Jane Eyre as a Female Gothic Novel – Student Pulse.

Arifa Akbar: We’ve come a long way since the ‘madwoman in the attic’: week in books – Reviews – Books – The Independent

For a long time, the mentally ill were dumb and mute in literature. Inarticulacy surrounded those lumped together as Bedlamites: Jane Eyre’s classic “madwoman” in the attic, for instance, served as little more than a plot device, a thing to fear and loathe that got in the way of a Gothic romance.

via Arifa Akbar: We’ve come a long way since the ‘madwoman in the attic’: week in books – Reviews – Books – The Independent.

What film should I watch at Christmas? Andrew Collins takes a look at memorable movies for every mood, from Bridget Jones to The King’s Speech, Whisky Galore! to Sightseers

Charlotte Brontë’s Jane Eyre (Mon 23, BBC2) gets a suitably windswept rendition, complete with rolling moors, Mia Wasikowska as the demure heroine and Michael Fassbender as a lean, mean Rochester.

via What film should I watch at Christmas? Andrew Collins takes a look at memorable movies for every mood, from Bridget Jones to The King’s Speech, Whisky Galore! to Sightseers.

Bronte letter to be auctioned in Edinburgh : The Edinburgh Reporter

A rare autographed letter signed, from Charlotte Brontë to a David Waldie, [L.R.C.S.] (1813-1889), thanking him for his appreciative comments regarding Jane Eyre and the gift of some “…little books”, addressed from Gloucester Terrace, London, dated January 19th, 1853 will be sold at Lyon & Turnbull tomorrow and is estimated to reach £10,000-12,000.

via Bronte letter to be auctioned in Edinburgh : The Edinburgh Reporter.