The Invisible Woman brings Dickens’ great affair to the screen | National Post

In the opening sequence of The Invisible Woman, the movie (screened at TIFF) about Charles Dickens’ late-life affair with a young actress, we meet the lady concerned, Ellen Ternan, in her own later life. She’s married and has given up the stage, though she’s putting her early training to use by supervising juvenile amateur dramatics. Somebody asks her whether she was the inspiration for Lucie Manette, the heroine of A Tale of Two Cities. She doesn’t deny it, but doesn’t seem to want to dwell on the matter. Neither does the film, which is a pity.

via The Invisible Woman brings Dickens’ great affair to the screen | National Post.

‘Dracula’ on NBC review – The Washington Post

A tip of the top hat to NBC for taking on a period drama — a lavish and risky proposition even in the best of times. Loosely derived from Bram Stoker’s novel, this “Dracula” stars Jonathan Rhys Meyers (“The Tudors”) as a revivified Vlad the Impaler, brought back from ossified, subterranean exile by an unlikely ally to wage battle against an age-old Order of the Dragon that has ensconced itself in Victorian-era upper society.

via ‘Dracula’ on NBC review – The Washington Post.

Gothic Contribution | The Kim Newman Web Site

The BFI is taking Britain to the dark heart of film with Gothic, this year’s BFI blockbuster project celebrating one of Britain’s biggest cultural exports as revealed through four compelling themes: Monstrous, The Dark Arts, Haunted, and Love is a Devil.As part of this celebration of the macabre, the BFI is releasing a lavishly illustrated publication called: Gothic: The Dark Heart of Film.

via Gothic Contribution | The Kim Newman Web Site.