BOOK REVIEW: ‘Daphne du Maurier and Her Sisters’ – Washington Times

Daphne Du Maurier And Her Sisters

This study of the three du Maurier sisters is part of a trend that involves suggesting, with varying degrees of subtlety, that the lesser-known siblings of superstars are the equals, or in some respect even the superior, in talent. This trend was slyly mocked by the witty Oxford novelist Barbara Trapido, who titled her debut “Brother of the More Famous Jack,” upending the relative renown of artist John Butler Yeats and his infinitely more famous brother the poet William Butler Yeats.

via BOOK REVIEW: 'Daphne du Maurier and Her Sisters' – Washington Times.

REVIEWS: ‘Taken By the Wind,’ by Ellen Hart; ‘The Vanishing,’ by Wendy Webb; ‘Delivering Death,’ by Julie Kramer; and ‘Lake of Tears,’ by Mary Logue | Star Tribune

The Vanishing

‘Last night I dreamt I went to Manderley again … ”

The opening line of Daphne DuMaurier’s 1938 classic, “Rebecca,” still evokes chills in fans of Gothic fiction. DuMaurier’s opening captures concisely two of the genre’s most suggestive and significant motifs: a narrator recalling a nightmarish time in her life, and a mansion filled with secrets where her nightmare occurs.

via REVIEWS: ‘Taken By the Wind,’ by Ellen Hart; ‘The Vanishing,’ by Wendy Webb; ‘Delivering Death,’ by Julie Kramer; and ‘Lake of Tears,’ by Mary Logue | Star Tribune.

Rebecca (1940) | British Film Institute

“Last night, I dreamt I went to Manderley again.”

These memorable opening lines evocatively set the scene for Rebecca – Daphne du Maurier’s popular novel and Hitchcock’s first American film project and winner of two Academy Awards (one for best picture).  A haunting gothic romance, Rebecca is a suspenseful study in guilt and anxiety, exploring themes of love, obsession and power.

via Rebecca (1940) | British Film Institute.