13 January (1849): Charlotte Bronte to William Smith Williams

Charlotte Bronte

At the time of this letter’s writing the Brönte household was in disarray. Branwell, Charlotte’s elder brother, had died from a case of alcoholism-enflamed bronchitis in September 1848. Soon after Branwell’s death, Emily succumbed to tuberculosis. All responsibility of the family’s care and upkeep fell to Charlotte, who took another blow when Anne, the youngest, started with a racking cough. Charlotte addresses William Smith Williams, one of her editors at the publishing house of Smith, Elder, and Co. Her hopes, outlined below, were too generous; Anne’s case of TB proved fatal in May.

via 13 January (1849): Charlotte Bronte to William Smith Williams.

What film should I watch at Christmas? Andrew Collins takes a look at memorable movies for every mood, from Bridget Jones to The King’s Speech, Whisky Galore! to Sightseers

Charlotte Brontë’s Jane Eyre (Mon 23, BBC2) gets a suitably windswept rendition, complete with rolling moors, Mia Wasikowska as the demure heroine and Michael Fassbender as a lean, mean Rochester.

via What film should I watch at Christmas? Andrew Collins takes a look at memorable movies for every mood, from Bridget Jones to The King’s Speech, Whisky Galore! to Sightseers.

Biography Reviews of Emily Bronte and Her Sisters | New Republic

he Brontës have always been novelists’ novelists, perhaps because their history is novelistic material—the six children in their bleak setting of the Yorkshire moors, their struggle against fate, marked by recurrent death—Maria and Elizabeth dying in childhood—Branwell’s fantastic tragedy, the simultaneous illumination of three personalities in Jane Eyre, Wuthering Heights, and Agnes Grey, fame and then death once more—Emily, Anne, Charlotte.

via Biography Reviews of Emily Bronte and Her Sisters | New Republic.