Bram Stoker’s great-grandnephew wants to attract visitors to the Romanian mountaintop that fictional Dracula may have called home.

BUCHAREST, Romania—About eight hours’ drive from the capital, and another four hours’ trek from the nearest road, Izvorul Calimanului Mountain looks like many of the Carpathians’ uninhabited peaks: snow-capped in the winter, fir trees thinning near its rocky 6,670-foot peak.

Few hikers visit, but Dacre Stoker thinks tourist dollars could erupt from the extinct Transylvanian volcano. Although he hasn’t visited yet, he’s currently co-writing a guidebook that he hopes will set his ambitious plan in motion. He envisages guided tours by local mountaineers, informative signage, and a nearby cultural center explaining the mountain’s unusual significance.

via Bram Stoker’s great-grandnephew wants to attract visitors to the Romanian mountaintop that fictional Dracula may have called home..

This week’s new dance | Stage | The Guardian

Dracula Ballet

The dark exoticism of Bram Stoker’s Dracula is a story that continues to haunt the choreographic imagination, with Mark Bruce having recently toured one of the most frighteningly physical dance adaptations of the novel to date. This autumn Northern Ballet revive David Nixon’s version. Nixon follows the original Stoker plot, using a score that weaves together music by Schnittke, Rachmaninov, Pärt and Daugherty. The dramatically gothic set design is by Ali Allen, with the multi-tasking Nixon designing the costumes himself.

via This week’s new dance | Stage | The Guardian.

From Bram Stoker to Stanley Kubrick, the British Library’s latest exhibition celebrates all things Gothic – Features – Art – The Independent

Fans of mist-drenched castles, ominous crows and ghostly hauntings must have been delighted to find that yesterday’s Google Doodle was dedicated to little-known Gothic novelist Sheridan Le Fanu.

via From Bram Stoker to Stanley Kubrick, the British Library's latest exhibition celebrates all things Gothic – Features – Art – The Independent.

The Cabinet of Dr Caligari review – occult scary-movie touchstone from 1920 | Film | The Guardian

Conrad Veidt, left, and Werner Krauss in The Cabinet of Dr Caligari. Photograph: Friedrich Wilhelm Murnau Stifling/Transit Film Gmbh

Warped in all senses, fascinating and bizarre: this is the 1920 silent movie by Robert Wiene – now re-released in cinemas – that lay down a template for today’s scary movies, noirs and psychological thrillers. And it is topped off with a surprise ending that still gets used all the time now. With all the weird gaping and gurning, and the distorted perspective of its expressionist sets, Caligari is a nightmarish cinematic extension of Bram Stoker’s 1897 classic Dracula, combining as it does romantic superstition with the supposedly rational world of psychiatric surveillance and control.

via The Cabinet of Dr Caligari review – occult scary-movie touchstone from 1920 | Film | The Guardian.