Gothic Romance Reviews: Gothic Romance: The Dark Allure (A Guest Post by author Alyne de Winter)

While the genre of Romance Fiction cuts a wide swath between the happily-ever-after Chick Lit comedies to the strains and stains of Dark Erotica, the Gothic Tale cuts a winding moonlit path right across the middle. From Charlotte Bronte’s Jane Eyre to Daphne DuMaurier’s Rebecca to Stephanie Myer’s Twilight series, Gothic Romance seeks to explore the mysteries of love, paying special attention to the dark side.

via Gothic Romance Reviews: Gothic Romance: The Dark Allure (A Guest Post by author Alyne de Winter).

Project MUSE – Bram Stoker: History, Psychoanalysis, and the Gothic review

The twelve essays in this collection go a long way toward correcting the mistaken impression that Bram Stoker wrote only a single Gothic work, Dracula 1897, or, more damaging, that he was a second-rate writer whose neurosis erupted into a modern myth. Indeed the Preface announces that "Stoker’s work blends the Gothic with the discourses of politics, sexuality, medicine and national identity to produce texts that may be read by a variety of critical methodologies" ix, and the accompanying essays demonstrate how Stoker blends the Gothic with fields that seem antithetical to its preoccupation with mystery — politics, medicine, and science, to mention a few.

via Project MUSE – Bram Stoker: History, Psychoanalysis, and the Gothic review.

Dracula, Theatre by the Lake, Keswick – review – Reviews – Theatre & Dance – The Independent

Dracula

Raw sexual energy, and society’s need to curb its wilder excrescences, are themes which bubble constantly just below the surface in the myth of the vampire. But in Liz Lochhead’s feminist Dracula the sexual politics implicit in the original become explicit and are held up for scrutiny.

via Dracula, Theatre by the Lake, Keswick – review – Reviews – Theatre & Dance – The Independent.