Mystery Text in 1504 Copy of Homer’s ‘Odyssey’ Is Deciphered – NBC News.com

A handwriting mystery involving a rare 1504 edition of Homer’s ancient Greek epic poem “The Odyssey” has been solved.

The University of Chicago Library had offered $1,000 to anyone who could decipher some handwritten scribblings found on the margins of multiple pages of Book 11 of “Odyssey,” but nowhere else in the volume.

via Mystery Text in 1504 Copy of Homer's 'Odyssey' Is Deciphered – NBC News.com.

Review: The Quick by Lauren Owen – The Yorker

In the dark depths of Victorian London is a secret society of gentlemen whose members are some of the most dangerous and ambitious in England. When James, a young poet, mysteriously disappears it is up to his sister Charlotte to find him. Soon Charlotte becomes embroiled with a whole cast of dark characters until she eventually discovers that the answer to her brother’s disappearance lies with the enigmatic Aegolius Club.

via Review: The Quick by Lauren Owen – The Yorker.

Gothic weekend in Whitby – in pictures | UK news | theguardian.com

It’s that time of year when gregarious goths gather in the April gloom of the North Yorkshire seaside town. This year the festival celebrates it’s 20th birthday, having started as a gathering of penpals who met via NME magazine. The organisers chose Whitby as home of the biannual event because of its links with Bram Stoker’s Dracula

via Gothic weekend in Whitby – in pictures | UK news | theguardian.com.

A Black Tulip Comes to the Pforzheimer Collection | The New York Public Library

Here at the Pforzheimer Collection, our big acquisition of the year is a black tulip, one of the rarest items in the Shelleyan world: Original Poetry by Victor and Cazire, 1810, Shelley’s first book of verse. Lost to the public eye shortly after its publication and believed, till 1898, to have vanished altogether, only three other copies are known; one of them is imperfect. Even the Bodleian Library, holder of the best Shelley collection in the world, does not own it.

Victor and Cazire is the product of Shelley’s early and powerful urge to publish, to make an author of himself. It’s also evidence of his inclination to literary collaboration; he was "Victor" and his sister Elizabeth (1794-1831) "Cazire," a name taken from Charlotte Dacre’s 1805 novel, Confessions of the Nun of St. Omer.

via A Black Tulip Comes to the Pforzheimer Collection | The New York Public Library.

Holy Shakespeare! A Rare Find Shakes An Industry

Baret’s Alvearie (1580)

George Koppelman and Dan Wechsler may have found the Holy Grail of rare books—a dictionary they claim was owned and annotated by William Shakespeare. If their assertion is true, this book could provide amazing insight into how Shakespeare crafted his plays, poems, and sonnets, all of which feature his highly inventive wordplay and have thus shaped how modern English is used today. Even if the scholarly community does not back their claims, their find will undoubtedly inspire further research and vigorous debate, and the book, Baret’s Alvearie (1580), will still be considered an important 16th century artifact with valuable Elizabethan-era annotations.

via Holy Shakespeare! A Rare Find Shakes An Industry.