‘The Problem of Slavery in the Age of Emancipation,’ by David Brion Davis – NYTimes.com

In 1862, when Nathaniel Hawthorne headed south from New England to see the Civil War firsthand, he came upon a group of former slaves trudging northward. “They seemed a kind of creature by themselves, not altogether human,” he wrote, “but perhaps quite as good, and akin to the fauns and rustic deities of olden times.” “Whoever may be benefited by the results of this war,” he added, “it will not be the present generation of negroes.”

via ‘The Problem of Slavery in the Age of Emancipation,’ by David Brion Davis – NYTimes.com.

The Fantastic and Gothic Art of David Palumbo

Fantasy art and illustration has a beautiful and rich history. From the beautiful and titillating Margaret Brundage covers for Weird Tales through the poster, magazine, and album art of Frank Frazetta to the contemporary work of Marc Silvestri, artists and illustrators have brought color and shape to worlds of wonder. Be they scenes from the past, the future, or lands that never were, art plays an important role in fleshing out description and dialog.

via The Fantastic and Gothic Art of David Palumbo.

Yesterday’s Papers: The Strange History of Spring-Heeled Jack (2)

1886 — Spring-Heeled Jack, the Terror of London No. 26, by the author of Turnpike Dick, the Star of the Road, London: Charles Fox, 48 numbers

MORNING NEWSPAPERS. In England in 1837 telegraphs and telephones did not exist. Evening reading was mostly done by candlelight. The streets were lit by gas which could appear quite dim on a misty day. Messages were sent by street-messengers or by the two-penny post, parcels were sent by foot or by coach. The railroads were in operation, but not one route had been completed by 1838. There were seven daily morning newspapers; the circulation leader was the Times, followed by the Morning Chronicle, Morning Post, Morning Herald, Morning Advertiser, and the Public Ledger. Many proprietors published an evening edition as well.

via Yesterday’s Papers: The Strange History of Spring-Heeled Jack (2).