Sotheby’s | Auctions – The Bay Psalm Book Sale,special projects | Sotheby’s

The Bay Psalm Book
The auction of one of only 11 surviving copies of the Bay Psalm Book – the first book printed in what is now the United States of America – set a new world auction record for any printed book when it sold for $14.2 million. This price is well in excess of the previous auction record for a printed book, established in December 2010 at Sotheby’s London when a copy of John James Audubon’sBirds of America sold for $11.5 million.

Bay Psalm Book

Sotheby’s | Auctions – The Bay Psalm Book Sale,special projects | Sotheby’s.

A Life with Mary Shelley – Barbara Johnson

In 1980, deconstructive and psychoanalytic literary theorist Barbara Johnson wrote an essay on Mary Shelley for a colloquium on the writings of Jacques Derrida. The essay marked the beginning of Johnson’s lifelong interest in Shelley as well as her first foray into the field of “women’s studies,” one of whose commitments was the rediscovery and analysis of works by women writers previously excluded from the academic canon. Indeed, the last book Johnson completed before her death was Mary Shelley and Her Circle, published here for the first time. Shelley was thus the subject for Johnson’s beginning in feminist criticism and also for her end.

via A Life with Mary Shelley – Barbara Johnson.

Mythology, monsters, and Mary Shelley: The enduring fascination of Frankenstein’s creation – Features – Books – The Independent

Mary Shelley

We will each write a ghost story, said Lord Byron, and his proposition was acceded to.” So wrote Mary Shelley in the preface to her first novel, Frankenstein, published in 1831, 15 years after one of the most mythologised events in literary history. That was the famous night at the Villa Diodati, near Lake Geneva, in 1816, when Byron, Mary Godwin, Percy Shelley and John Polidori, Byron’s doctor, gathered by the fire to make up ghost stories. Two of the horror genre’s most enduring monsters were born: the vampire and Victor Frankenstein’s unnamed creation. But Mary also wrote herself into fiction by mythologising further a group of writers who have been the subject of both biography and fiction, ever since.

via Mythology, monsters, and Mary Shelley: The enduring fascination of Frankenstein’s creation – Features – Books – The Independent.

Paperback review: British Gothic Cinema, By Barry Forshaw – Reviews – Books – The Independent

Fans of Hammer will relish its defence in this erudite survey, particularly against the insistence of Peter Cushing and Christopher Lee that they had merely made “colourful fantasies”. In Forshaw’s view, Curse of Frankenstein is “deeply visceral”, while Dracula is “subversive… perfectly constructed”.

via Paperback review: British Gothic Cinema, By Barry Forshaw – Reviews – Books – The Independent.