Edgar Allan Poe’s First Fiction: Are His Older Brother’s Stories Really His? : The New Yorker

Sometimes, as Edgar Allan Poe mused in “The Purloined Letter,” a secret hides in plain sight. After Poe’s first poetry collection, “Tamerlane and Other Poems,” débuted in 1827—anonymously, and quite sensibly so, as the eighteen-year-old author was on the run from creditors—two of his poems (“The Happiest Day” and “Dreams”) reappeared that autumn in the North American, a short-lived weekly newspaper in Baltimore. They didn’t run with Edgar’s name, though, but under the initials W.H.P.—William Henry Leonard Poe.

via Edgar Allan Poe's First Fiction: Are His Older Brother's Stories Really His? : The New Yorker.