Bookquick/“Charles Brockden Brown’s Revolution and the Birth of American Gothic” | Penn Current

In 1798, a decade after the Founding Fathers created a nation based on the principles of liberty and equality, Charles Brockden Brown, then an unknown Philadelphia writer, invented the American Gothic novel. His first book, “Wieland,” is the story of a religious fanatic haunted by demonic voices instructing him to murder his wife and children. In subsequent works, a young country bumpkin confronts the depravities of city existence, an impecunious daughter becomes the erotic obsession of an insane egomaniacal rationalist and a sleepwalker awakes to—and participates in—the extremes of frontier savagery.

via Bookquick/“Charles Brockden Brown’s Revolution and the Birth of American Gothic” | Penn Current.

Method to the Madness – NYTimes.com

Method to the Madness - NYTimes.com

In his tales of Gothic horror, Edgar Allan Poe gave the world a fine collection of neurotics, paranoids and psychopaths. But none are quite as deranged as the narrator of “The Cask of Amontillado.” His name is Montresor, and his story opens with a threat: “The thousand injuries of Fortunato I had borne as I best could, but when he ventured upon insult I vowed revenge.” What a wealth of pathology is revealed in these words; it becomes immediately clear that the “thousand injuries” Montresor mentions are less harmful to him than the “insult” he claims to have suffered.

via Method to the Madness – NYTimes.com.

RICHARD MATHESON

Richard Matheson, who has died aged 87, was an American writer whose many short stories, novels, screenplays and television scripts were among the most significant and original works of horror and fantasy of the last century.

via RICHARD MATHESON.